3 Tips For Traveling With an Anxiety Disorder

Living day to day with anxiety issues can be difficult, to say the least. The constant parade of “what ifs,” “I wonder what they meant by that,” and “why did that take so long,” is enough to drive someone to the edge. Those of us with anxiety are perpetually in a state of defense.

This barrage of fears wears thin on our intellect, self esteem, and our confidence. Most of us learn through trial and error what we can handle and what we can’t and have discovered the path of least resistance. However, traveling is a whole new ball game in many aspects. So, here are a few cheat codes that will help you travel more peacefully.

Have A Plan

Many of us love the thought of a road trip or spending the week at the beach, but taking a trip with anxiety seems like an impossible task to someone who can’t help but overanalyze everything. At home, we have our routines and familiar surroundings.

We know where to go and what to do when we feel overwhelmed or the onslaught of a panic attack. Everything is right there. One of the ways to combat anxiety issues on the road is to make sure there is a plan. If you can, you should plan every day of your trip to the best of your ability.

You need to know where you’re going to stop on the way there and back and what you want to accomplish each day, even if it’s just sitting by the beach all day. This eliminates a lot of the questions about the day allowing you to concentrate more on relaxation and having fun.

Stick to It

After you have worked out your plan for the trip, do your absolute best to stick to it. Unpredictability is a panic attack’s best friend. If you have things that you know might have a good possibility of changing or getting canceled altogether, make sure to plan backups. This will relieve a lot of the stress uncertainty brings. Remember not to pressure yourself too badly to follow things to the letter. As we know, this too, can cause problems for those with anxiety issues.

Bring Your Comfort

There are a few things that all of us who deal with anxiety gave in common. We all have certain things, events, or situations that trigger our issues, but we also have things or habits that we know help us to center ourselves in the middle of a crisis. For some, it’s a cold rag on the back of their neck and a dark room. Some carry comfort objects such as a pillowcase, a stuffed animal, or a specific song.

Still, others have comforting habits like counting, singing, or washing the dishes. The point is to make sure whatever your comfort mechanism is follows you on your trip. This way, should a situation get to be too much to handle, you can retreat until you are centered and can do it in a way you are already accustomed to.

Anxiety is troublesome, but doesn’t have to hold you back from doing what you want and spending time with those you love.

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